Five Models of Organisational Behaviour

The five models of organisational behaviour are the:

  • autocratic model,
  • custodial model,
  • supportive model,
  • collegial model and
  • system model.

Autocratic model

Autocratic model is the model that depends upon strength, power and formal authority.

In an autocratic organisation, the people (management/owners) who manage the tasks in an organisation have formal authority for controlling the employees who work under them. These lower-level employees have little control over the work function. Their ideas and innovations are not generally welcomed, as the key decisions are made at the top management level.

The guiding principle behind this model is that management/owners have enormous business … Read more...

Inputs, Processes and Outcomes Model of OB

Organisational behaviour understanding delivers enhanced performance

The goal of studying organisation behaviour is to deliver enhanced outcomes for the organisation. Although it may occur, it is not the goal of the organisation to create a “nice place to work” for its employees.

Instead, the intention of organisation behaviour is to think about how to structure the organisation must effectively in order to achieve its goals and desired outcomes.

Like any system, the basic organisation behaviour model is built around inputs, processes and outcomes.

Inputs

The inputs to the organisational model is how the organisation chooses to structure itself, structure roles, … Read more...

The 4 Main Workforce Trends That We Are Facing Today

It comes as no surprise that in the last 50 years a lot has changed around the world, and with that a lot has changed in the workplaces within organisations around the world. Without these changes, growth wouldn’t have happen and on the more negative side, the market crashes wouldn’t had happened.

Yet through the thick and thin, change is important within the world and organisations. It is needed to keep us thinking, keep us on our toes and keep us growing.

In this article, the first for the My Organisational Behaviour Blog, we will explore the eight main … Read more...

Changing Culture over Time

Culture Definition: Cultures in organisation is defined by how the organisation is run, how the personalities within the organisation interact with each other and also how the structure of the company is set out.
Most organisations tend to start off as a power culture, this is because it is set up by a person and he/she wants to run the company their own way, doing what they want to do and meeting their personal objectives, with the help of subordinates.
This leads to organisation growth though, and this means that a power culture will no longer work.
To continue … Read more...

Culture in Organisations

Culture Definition: The human-generated part of the environment that is transmitted across time and generations and leads to people within that culture developing shared meanings; culture gives people ‘standard operating procedures’ or ways of doing things. Often said to be ‘the ways things are done around here’ culture is a major point within an organisation as it can lead to success or failure. It is important to manage culture and try and install one which works well for the type of organisation, the objectives and goals the business has set and the recruitment practices in place.

Organisational Culture Definition: The … Read more...

Groups and Teams in Organisations

Group Definition: In the setting of an organisation, a group is the collection of people who are located, grouped or gathered together, either by classification or in a more general sense. People are often put in groups, such as a department, or groups are created by the same culture or objectives within an organisation.

Team Definition: A team in an organisation is defined… Read more...

Job Design in Organisations

Job Design Definition:  Job Design, which can also be called Work Design or Task Design, is the process of assigning tasks to a job, including the interdependency of those tasks with other jobs. It is to help improve the employees relationship with the job in hand and increase the quality of the product or service at the same time. Job Design has an importance within keeping an organisation at the right standard of work and employee ethics.

The following are some definitions by scholars in the field, this may help as they are a good way to start off … Read more...

Organisational Behaviour Theories to Learn for Exam

The following is just a list of the Organisational Behaviour Theories that you will probably need to learn for an OB exam.

Organisational Behaviour

  • Multidisciplinary Approach
  • Fundamental Attribution Error

Intelligence

  • One General Intelligence
  • Theories of Multiple Intelligence
  • Emotional Intelligence

Personality

  • Predicting Job Performance
  • Cattell’s 16 Personality Factors (16PF)
  • 2 Dimensions of Personality
  • Big Five Model
  • Psyche (Freud)
  • Personality Types A and B

Perception

  • Gestalt Principles
  • Fundamental Attribution Error

Motivation

  • Motivation Model
  • Common-sense 1, 2 and 3
  • Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
  • Herzberg’s Two-factor Theory
  • Modified Needs Hierarchy Model
  • Achievement Motivation Theory
  • Expectancy Theory
  • Goal-setting Theory

Attitudes and Behaviour

  • Organisational Behaviour Modification
Read more...

Intelligence within Organisational Behaviour: Lecture Notes

The following covers the objectives which we need to learn for the topic of ‘Intelligence’. The notes below are guidelines to what we should know, they do not go into detail, to find more detail please use the search at the top and find the corresponding theory on the website.

Objective: To critique definitions of intelligence

  • Intelligence is the capacity of an individual to process information and use the information to behave effectively. (Arnold)
  • We don’t know where intelligence comes from, is it genes? Social environment? How much is inherited?

Objective: To compare and contrast two opposing schools of thought:

Read more...